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How to Keep Your Home Cool in the Summer

You’re hot.

No, really, we mean it.

But beating that heat can cost you some big bucks on your next utility bill.

Oh…did you think we were talking about something else?

The summer months in Florida are great for swimming, exploring, and enjoying friends and family. Unfortunately, the high temperatures can be a significant financial strain due to near-constant air conditioning use. Here are some ways you can keep your cool:

  1. Close those blinds! Up to 30 percent of unwanted heat comes from your windows. Shades and curtains can lower your indoor temperature up to 20 degrees.
  2. Dehumidify both your house and yourself. A dehumidifier removes moisture from the air, which will leave you feeling dry and cool. Dress yourself in light, breathable fabrics such as cotton, and use the same strategy for your bedsheets.
  3. If you can’t handle the heat, don’t use the kitchen. You know that wave of heat bursting out of the oven when you’re just trying to retrieve the casserole? That can have an affect not only on your face but also on the internal temperature of the house. Opt instead for using an outside grill, microwave, or crockpot. If you’ve never tried caramelizing onions in the slowcooker, we need to have a talk.
  4. Get a big fan. No, not the kind who wants autographs and demands selfies from awkward angles. Grab that pedestal fan from the back of your closet and plug that bad boy in. Pro tip: place a few frozen water bottles in front of the fan for an ultra-chill experience.
  5. Make sure you ceiling fan is spinning in the right direction. At the base of your ceiling fan you will find a switch which changes the direction of the blades. Counter-clockwise forces air down and makes you feel cooler. Clockwise circulates the air through the room and does not blow directly on you or your guests.
  6. Unplug appliances that aren’t in use. You’ll reduce heat output and save money. Consider taking advantage of the heat and instead of using your clothes dryer, hang your laundry outside.
  7. Keep in mind, the first thing the sun reaches is your roof. It’s critical to have proper ventilation, like ridge vents and soffit vents, under the edge of your roof. Consider replacing your roof with a cooler colored one. Or for a less intensive fix, a flat roof can be sealed with a cooler sealant to help reflect the sun.

 

Stay cool this summer!

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How to Check for Asbestos in Your Home

What is asbestos?

Asbestos refers to a group of six types of naturally occurring minerals.

  1. Chrysotile
  2. Crocidolite
  3. Amosite
  4. Anthophyllite
  5. Tremolite
  6. Actinolite

These minerals are made of fine, durable fibers that are resistant to heat, fire, and numerous chemicals. Asbestos becomes a hazard when it is airborne. If asbestos in the home becomes damaged, asbestos fibers may be released.

 

How do I know if there is asbestos in my home?

Many homes built before 1980 contain asbestos in old floor tiles ceiling tiles, roof shingles and flashing, siding, insulation (around boilers, ducts, pipes, sheeting, fireplaces), pipe cement, and joint compound used on seams between pieces of sheetrock. Newer houses can contain asbestos as well.

 

How do I know if I have been exposed to asbestos?

Asbestos is known to cause mesothelioma, a fatal cancer that affects the lining of the lungs, as well as other cancers and lung-related illnesses.

Symptoms of Asbestos

  • shortness of breath
  • tightness in your chest
  • persistent dry cough
  • chest pain
  • appetite loss
  • finger clubbing (enlarged fingertips)
  • nail deformities

If you have been exposed to asbestos and do not show symptoms you should schedule a regular check ups with your regular primary physician. If you are showing symptoms go straight to an asbestos-related disease specialist.

 

How to Check For Asbestos in Your Home

A visual inspection of your home is usually not sufficient to determine if it contains asbestos. To sufficiently check, samples of suspected asbestos fibers should be sent to a certified laboratory for analysis. Polarized Light Microscopy (PLM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) are two approved methods of analysis. The American Lung Association recommends that you hire a certified asbestos professional to take any samples. Hiring a professional can minimize asbestos exposure for you and your family.

 

Apachee Roofing does not offer asbestos or lead removal services, however, we recommend Big Bend Abatement in the Tallahassee, Florida area and surrounding counties.

 

They may be reached at:

 Address: 507 Casowdun Rd, Quincy, FL 32351

Phone: (850) 875-1804